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What do Anal Warts Look Like?

Often, anal warts have a flattened appearance and appear in clusters. This means they are grouped in small “clusters”, and their color may match the surrounding skin or be slightly lighter.

One of the major challenges of warts in the anus is that some people, upon noticing a bump in that area, assume it’s hemorrhoids.

While it’s true that hemorrhoids are among the most well-known anal conditions, they are far from the only ones. Moreover, a wart differs from hemorrhoids in its appearance and even texture, with warts potentially being rough to the touch.

On the other hand, anal condylomas are characteristic symptoms of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). If you’ve noticed an unusual bump in the anus or feel any related discomfort, it’s best to see a doctor.

Anal Warts and HPV

You might wonder, what do anal warts look like as they begin to appear? Typically, they appear as small spots and initially show minimal growth.

These lesions arise due to skin thickening caused by HPV affecting the epithelial cells, leading to a series of bumps.

Another characteristic of these lesions is their size. Although they can be small, they can also grow large enough to cover the anal region. Of course, in such cases, the lesion becomes extremely bothersome.

What symptoms do anal warts cause?

Woman thinking

Condylomas in the anus can cause symptoms such as pain and swelling in that area, as it’s in a location easily irritated.

Friction from underwear can cause the skin to become irritated, leading to pain or swelling. Additionally, this area comes into contact when we use the bathroom, leading to more manipulation.

All of this can cause itching or pain from the warts, and in some cases, they can even bleed. Of course, symptoms vary depending on the individual case and the severity of the lesions.

Post-defecation bleeding is another consequence of anal HPV, and some people report increased discharge in the area.

These were some tips to help you know how to deal with HPV. However, there is much more you need to do if you really want to get rid of HPV and warts forever.

What you need to do is GET RID OF THE ROOT of the problem.

For that reason, I recommend you to look into Dr. Kirkland's story and how he was able to cure HPV and get rid of warts for good.

Click here to see what he did

How are these lesions diagnosed?

Man thinking

If you’ve noticed warty lesions in the anus, the best course of action is to see a doctor. Clinical examination and observation are sufficient for a diagnosis.

The doctor will determine whether it’s indeed an HPV wart, but in most cases, this is the underlying cause.

Part of the importance of seeing a doctor, besides, of course, getting rid of the warts, is to increase prevention against other risks.

Keep in mind that HPV is a risk factor for certain types of cancer, applicable to both men and women. The doctor will conduct evaluations to check for other lesions and determine if any are precancerous.

Anoscopy Examination

An anoscopy helps determine if there are papilloma lesions inside the anal cavity. It’s an evaluation that shouldn’t be painful, and anesthesia isn’t even required.

This procedure is straightforward and crucial for preventing HPV-related cancer risks. Remember, this applies to both men and women; both can develop anal condylomas due to HPV.

How long do anal warts last?

In some cases, anal HPV lesions disappear on their own within 6 weeks. But this tends to be when the warts aren’t too large or widespread.

However, if the lesions don’t improve or vanish within months, it’s crucial to see a doctor. Keep in mind that if you receive treatment for the warts, you’ll see results much faster.

For example, after surgery to remove HPV warts, the lesions will disappear instantly. But other methods, like cryotherapy, can take up to two weeks to remove the warts.

What happens if I don’t treat anal warts?

Ignoring anal warts is not advisable, especially given their location. Remember, they can grow and obstruct the anal region.

A rupture and subsequent bleeding from these lesions can increase the risk of infection. Meanwhile, seeing a doctor can heighten prevention against cancer risks due to the Human Papillomavirus.

How to remove anal warts?

Doctor smiling at the camera.

Treatment for anal warts depends on each case; your doctor should assess your situation and recommend the best approach.

If the warts are small and on the skin around the anus (i.e., external), topical medications like creams can be applied.

For instance, 0.5% podophyllin is a common topical treatment for HPV warts. While highly effective, it requires multiple applications.

Camellia sinensis-based creams

Camellia sinensis, the scientific name for green tea, is beneficial for treating HPV. It has an immunocompetent function, enhancing the body’s immune response against the virus and its symptoms.

Other treatments for removing anal warts

Electrocautery can be used to eliminate such lesions. Although the procedure itself is painless, it might cause some inflammation afterward.

Alternatively, surgery can be performed to remove these lesions, especially in cases where the warts are large.

You should also know that many doctors combine these treatments with immunotherapy, aiming to strengthen the immune system and prevent the recurrence of these lesions.

Lastly… what should you do if you have HPV?

These were some tips to help you know how to deal with HPV. However, there is much more you need to do if you really want to get rid of HPV and warts forever.

What you need to do is GET RID OF THE ROOT of the problem.

For that reason, I recommend you to look into Dr. Kirkland's story and how he was able to cure HPV and get rid of warts for good.

Click here to see what he did

I wish you great success in your recovery!

Sources:

Dr. Amy Wilson

Medically reviewed by Dr. Amy Wilson. Dr. Amy Wilson, born in the United States, obtained her medical degree from Lincoln University School of Medicine. Specializing in obstetrics and gynecology, she’s dedicated 15 years to women’s health, becoming a distinguished gynecologist and serving in various U.S. medical institutions.

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